“Hypnotic suggestions” – that’s what Drama Method is fundamentally about. Aimed at women trying to nab a guy, this training is all about the thoughts and discussions that must go on between a woman and her guy so that the ‘drama’ can resolve itself, even with much heartache and conflict.

According to the authors, Elaine Chase and Aaron Fox, the idea is to “soak” oneself in all the segments available (and there are many) until it works its magic. The method offered here is that relationships work best when they are full of drama. Better still, so the authors claim, is that it is men that secretly yearn for all this drama in their dating and relationships.

Men want the drama, they just don’t know it as well as women do. Therefore, women, to whom this drama comes more easily, must guide (read: prod, instigate, coerce, emotionally blackmail) men into wanting and accepting this innate drama in all relationships. How convincing and how effective this philosophy and the proposed method are will form the basis of this Drama Method review.

Summary:

The Drama Method advocates that drama and conflict is not only central to relationships, but entirely necessary and beneficial. Without these elements, relationships become tired, listless and rote. The methodology here put the woman in the driving seat, manipulating her male partner into being an active player in the conflict and drama, sprinkled with some love, romance and great sex.

The Drama Method does itself no favours. The content is presented in the most uninspired and uninteresting manner possible, much of it on the basis of scenarios that are so banal and so Young Adult sentimental that many women will cringe when wading through it all. What were the authors thinking in presenting their method in so lazy and boring a manner?

There might be some interesting concepts and material in the midst of the mountains of content on offer here, but it’s lost in the mind-numbing way it’s displayed. The writing is so meandering and so poor that it kills the material, rendering it unsatisfying. It’s dull overkill that may even come across as bogus.

The Lowdown…

Drama Method sure commences with a bang, with nothing less than this on the site’s homepage:

Quite a homepage statement...

Quite a homepage statement…

Is the Drama Method message that important and will it shock the life out of one…?! Hmmmm, let’s see…

The first segment of Drama Method is the “true love story” between Amy and Derek. This is presented in a PDF and entitled “Emotional Hook Formula” by Elaine Chase and Aaron Fox. Hang on a moment, but I thought this was “Drama Method” – where did the emotional hook thing come in? Who knows.

Divided into 9 chapters, this ebook is primarily from the perspective of Amy. This being training aimed at women, that approach does make sense. Amy and Derek have been together for seven years, but there’s trouble in their paradise, and she even contemplates how her mother feels that Derek is “abusive” and “toxic” (sounds pretty typical to me), and even her friends think the relationship is a lost cause.

He doesn’t seem present, according to Amy, and even treats her like a doormat. She recalls all the times that he has let her down, been too nonchalant with her feelings for him and, worst of all, made it clear to her that he had no intention of spending the rest of his life with her – jokingly, of course. And she stays with this guy because…? No wonder they’ve both got a case of the Seven Year Itch.

We all known how muddled, irrational and downright gooey one’s thoughts and emotions can get in a relationship. Many have been down that Alice in Wonderland road of batshit crazy emotions and thinking that has no basis in logic – love can be a bitch that way. But what woman wants to read about all that craziness as part of a training course on how to get a guy?

And especially when it is written like this. This ebook is an ode to cringe worthy writing. Here’s a zinger: “Emotionally he was drained, he was too far gone to be saved, it seemed. Earlier the same day, Derek had proposed to Amy, in a way that he felt was, in the very least, worthy of an“Emmy Award” [sic]. He had tried to be as romantic as a fairy tale kiss itself, but had apparently failed”. Yeah, I knew you’d love it.

Trying to be as romantic as a fairy tale kiss *shiver* aside, the ebook chronicles the trials and tribulations of Amy and Derek’s love affair. After what is clearly a bad spell and to make it up to her, Derek takes them biking on a two person bicycle, and then leads her down a remote path only for her to see photos of  them pinned to the trees along the path, by way of reminding her of what they have (I kid you not).

Here’s another take from that same lovers-path-from-hell: “You see that tree stump over there, covered in roses?”, he described. “Yes, I saw it earlier, it’s so beautiful! Derek, how did you do that?”, she exclaimed. “Well, each rose is made out of paper, and inside each one, there’s a little note for you, for each of the days that we have been on a date. I made one, after every date we had, and hid them under my bed. Go check them out. Pick any one you like.”, he smiled.

It’s saccharine in the extreme, I know. For many (this reviewer included) this is the type of icky scenario-building that is so revolting that no method, however brilliant, could take the taste of bile out of one’s mouth. Perhaps those of us who react like this are too cynical, too jaded. Perhaps. But why must it read like the worse of Mills and Boon?

The writing here makes 50 Shades of Grey seem like Leo Tolstoy’s War and Peace. Amy has to realize that she has made it too easy for Derek, and that is why he takes her for granted. She must spice it up and make him desire her again: enter drama and conflict. Eventually Amy and Derek live happily ever after. Ring-a-ding-ding.

Part 2 further explores the notion of good stress (known as ‘eustress’) versus bad stress, or distress. According to the authors, “Good stress is the embodiment of necessary drama. It’s the kinds of thrills that we allow ourselves to experience or go through, so that we can experience a peak mode of
ultimate pleasure and happiness”.

For Chase and Fox, it’s nothing less than, “the more the necessary drama, the merrier”. It’s what they contend is akin to winning an “emotional lottery”. Jeepers, who knew that dating and relationships had to be so exhausting, hey?!
The bottom line is that men need, indeed crave, this drama in a relationship because they are emotionally and mentally constructed in that way. There are four steps to a woman achieving this: Step 1: You Charge Him Up Emotionally; Step 2: You Offer A Little Relief From The Charge; Step 3: You Make Him Work To Get Complete Relief and; Step 4: Renew Him. All very self-explanatory, of course.

Part 3 introduces the Instant Intimacy Intensifying Technique, which is best encapsulated with these words: “…sex should actually NOT mean commitment. When you turn intimacy into this “end all” or “be all” kind of a reality, you are ultimately making a huge deal, out of something that never meant as much to the guy, as it meant to you”. Actually, there could be some truth to that, we guys can attest.

Part 4 makes the (valid) point that men very often do not commit to a woman emotionally, however much they may commit physically and otherwise. Only when they are emotionally vested in a woman, will true commitment come home to roost. Ways for a woman to improve on this is by means of the ‘Respect Frequency’, which is that a woman must make a man feel special and respected every day – or risk losing him.

By the end of the four (painfully arduous and tortuous) parts of the ebook series this much is clear: drama is at the centre of all things relationship, whether the physical or the emotional. It is up to the woman to navigate this minefield, with her male companion in tow, showing him every step of the way how all the conflict and drama is what spices up the relationship. It’s for his own good anyway.

Extras

Drama Method is also presented in a 32-part audio book. The narration is done by a (male) voice that is clearly computer-generation. This has a distancing effect which makes the material come across more formal and far more like one of those audio ‘self help guides’ that can be heard while driving in a car or laying in bed at night that are so often parodied in movies and in TV shows.

The tinny, robotic voice of the audio book almost lulled me to sleep, to be honest, which was actually quite nice and soothing. It was also quite creepy and I gave up after a few minutes of listening to a few of the 32 parts. I have a feeling some women would also find the experience quasi-creepy.

There are quite a few more PDFs on offer. The ones written by Aaron Fox with titles like “Mind Scanner Report” and “Shameless Truth Report” are risible.The former basically tells us that reading a man’s mind is not that easy (no kidding), whilst the latter is about the tremendous fear men feel in trying to express their emotions. All written in that twee ‘real scenario’ style that one could find very grating.

Mind Scanner Report

Mind Scanner Report

Elaine Chase gives us the ‘Emotion Buildup Report’ which discusses two different kinds of
curiosity “pricks” that a woman can use in order to test how well her man thinks he understands you. These are the sarcasm brand, and the ambiguity brand. Yip, it’s playing games time, folks!

In her ‘Intense Addiction Report’, Chase discusses how if it’s draining or monotonous to spend time together, then that will ultimately destroy the relationship. No kidding, Sherlock. The key, Chase tells us, is to somehow “manage the intensity” and prioritize positive energy between each other. How she tells us to do it is not only long-winded and boring, but frankly unconvincing.

Bonus features include ‘6 Ways To Get Your Ex Back,’  ’23 Things Men Secretly Wished You Knew – But Would Never Tell You To Your Face’ by Anna Wilson, which, although not earth-shattering in what it suggests, does actually provide some interesting tidbits. It’s maybe not such a good idea to have bonus features that are more entertaining and possibly useful than your own touted methods. perhaps…?

A better written bonus feature?

A better written bonus feature?

To its credit, all of the bonus features on Drama Method are free. It’s always gratifying to be on a site such as this and not get inundated with links that are obviously expensive clickbait ‘extras’ and ‘offers of a lifetime’. Yet, even the freebies on Drama Method feel flat, so uninteresting and poorly arranged is the method and content on offer here.

And how does it look and feel?

Zero. That’s what it looks like – like nothing. You would be hard pushed to come across a dating training course with less visual zing and appeal than Drama Method. In fact, it has no look or distinct branding whatsoever, period. Very odd, surely, when you consider that women are supposedly very attuned to the visual?

As you can see, the landing page for the members’ area is really visually arresting:

Members' landing page for Drama Method

Members’ landing page for Drama Method

What’s To Like About Drama Method?

  • The central premise that drama and conflict make for a more dynamic and even healthy relationship is actually a very interesting, even compelling one. There could be an element of truth to it, even if presented in this nefariously boring format.
  • It does at least try to present women and men and the dating-relationship world as if populated by adults. The writing may belie that ‘adulthood’ at the heart of their thesis, but at least the writers don’t come off as a bunch of puerile fratboys or one of those smirky ‘dating guru’ guys that dominate this genre
  • It doesn’t annoy the reader with glaring links and banners that provide ‘extras’ that are obvious clickbait, full of expensive money-grabbing bullshit. The extras and bonuses on offer here are all appear to be free, and that is commendable

What’s Not To Like About Drama Method?

  • It’s pathetically written. Talk about hokey, schlocky writing! The dating and relationship ‘scenarios’ are not convincing, however ‘real’ they may be, with language and dialogue that is frufru in the extreme. It reads for the most part like a hopeless tween romance written for hopelessly romantic 14-year-old girls, and not for smart, sophisticated women in their 20s and older.
  • There’s just too much of this damn stuff. It just goes on and on and on. I have complained about this before, and I will do it again here: why, oh why, must these dating guru writers inundate their readers with so many hundreds of pages of dry, boring death-by-PDF?! It never ceases to amaze me that gurus will write so much content in this day and age of soundbites and such acutely short attention spans. It’s bizarre.
  • Some of the philosophy on here is frankly dodgy. Women come across having to be manipulative and having to ‘make their male partners react in the right way’ – yet again. Men come across as hapless twerps who don’t know what’s good for them. I know some women will love the idea of that, but come on! And the idea, whilst beguiling, that drama and conflict are essential in a relationship, there will no doubt be many, both men and women, who will find the idea simply off-putting, if not downright horrible. All that endless drama and inner conflicts – surely it gets tiring?!

Conclusion

Drama Method has a lot of steam and even some heat, but very little substance. In essence it is about the drama that must be endlessly at the heart of any relationship if it is to work. Because that is what both women and men want and need, so this method opines. And the woman has to do nearly all the work, of course.

The ultimate effect of Drama Method is a case study in how not to present training of this kind: Do not overwhelm your reader with endless, never ending content – it is not necessary. Do not present your content and all its many, many parts in a humungously boring format, with absolutely no visual appeal whatsoever. And, whatever you do, don’t write it as if it’s pitched at the tween market. That just might piss off grownup women.

There may be women who find Drama Method appealing. It may appeal to the bookish women who doesn’t mind wading through scores of pages of wandering prose. It may appeal to the women who…no, sorry, I just don’t believe it will appeal to most women. This will surely come across as overblown, poorly written and simplistic tosh for any thinking woman. That is why it comes so close to being a big, fat fail.

Rating: E

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